Women’s March 2018

Over a thousand people gathered to show their support for Women's Rights

Photo by Faythe Miller

Over a thousand people gathered to show their support for Women's Rights

Zara Khan, North Editor-in-Chief

 

*Warning: sexual assault and rape mention*

Last saturday, Jan 20. marked the anniversary of the Women’s March, which started to protest Trump’s inauguration organized by co-presidents Tamika D. Mallory and Bob Bland. Taking place all over the U.S., the Women’s March generated one of the largest single-day protests in history. The March on Oklahoma took place in the State Capitol in Oklahoma city as well as Tulsa at 11am and was led by Sheri Amore.

A wave of empowerment spread through the Capitol as the organizers and speakers shared their experiences and encouraged others to persist. The speeches shed light on a multitude of issues like the violence against Native American women, awareness for the transgender community and the lack of women running for office, among other things.

Those who try to discredit the Women’s March by spewing out cliche responses like “we’re already equal” dont seem to comprehend that women need more than just the right to vote. According to data found by the Huffington Post,  17,700,000 women have been victims of rape since 1998 and 99 percent of perpetrators of sexual violence will walk free. Also women are paid less than men for doing the exact same job, based on findings from CNN, Labor Department data shows that women earned 82 cents for every dollar a man made in 2016. This pay gap means women lose around $10,470 in median earnings a year (NWLC). The gender gap is much larger for women of color. Besides this, there is an alarming lack of women in public office. In 2016, NPR reported that women only make up around 19 percent of all members in Congress. Due to this lack of representation, we have men deciding women’s rights issues, especially reproductive rights, which many people have issues with. We need to end the double standard when it comes between men and women and should support women because it can beneficial for everyone.

Last  year, the 180 million women and men who participated in the Women’s March wore pink knitted “pussy hats” to bring attention to Trump’s comments about women and the need for female bodily autonomy. However, the Women’s March is not just about pussy hats; it is about seeking justice, equality and freedom for women all around the world.

The Women’s March is for ALL women, including women of color, queer women, trans women, disabled women, muslim women etc…Partaking in the march is only the first step, we need to take action and make all realms of society inclusive for those are marginalized, and use our voices for the voiceless.

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For more information on what to do to  help women’s rights click here.