“Ginger”: the mature revitalization of Brockhampton

%22Ginger%22%2C+shows+self-reflection+and+acceptance+of+the+lives+they+once+spited
Back to Article
Back to Article

“Ginger”: the mature revitalization of Brockhampton

"Ginger", shows self-reflection and acceptance of the lives they once spited

Photo Provided

"Ginger", shows self-reflection and acceptance of the lives they once spited

Photo Provided

Photo Provided

"Ginger", shows self-reflection and acceptance of the lives they once spited

Tala Trad, Memorial Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Following the success of their last album “Iridescence” in 2018 and the famed releases of “SATURATION” I, II and III in 2017, the status of the “All American Boyband” Brockhampton was unknown.

It was expected that they would produce another rap album with the same energy and daring excitement as what preceded it in the short timespan they usually release albums, but as time went by, it appeared that the group had hit a creative wall. 

Yet, despite that, Brockhampton released the much anticipated studio album “Ginger” on Aug. 23 showing a more serious side of the outlandish and spirited rap group.

This sort of paradigm shift for the rap group has caught the eyes of many, but it is not a topic the group has shied away from. In fact, in most of Brockhampton’s songs are lyrically pessimistic and describe the trials and hardships different members have faced under the guise of energetic beat and samples. The real shift is in their response to that same destitution and the actual sound, reflecting that the group as a whole has become more self-assured. 

The album opens with “NO HALO,” a piece on their imperfections with guitar instrumentals used to transition into the next track, “SUGAR.” Both songs impose a sense of longing for something perfect or someone wholesome to fill the hollowness left behind from past relationships and drugs. Together they have mellow and more down tempo sounds used more frequently in R&B or alternative music, not rap. 

A twist on the guitar sound is apparent on track three, “BOY BYE,” drawing similarities to Bossa Nova jazz until the beat kicks in and and the tone is more boastful as the group talks about their success with little glimpses into their past troubled lives

That and “I BEEN BORN AGAIN,” the eighth track on “Ginger”, seem to be the most consistent sounding songs off of their whole album, giving off the catchy feel that their SATURATION trilogy was so victorious in accomplishing. 

The three songs in the middle of the album all make some religious reference, “HEAVEN BELONGS TO YOU”, “ST. PERCY” and “IF YOU PRAY RIGHT,” mentioning the possible various beliefs of individual group members and how for some, it has caused issues, and for others, a solace. The sound of these three tracks differ from the first three in that these sound more like traditional rap songs. However, the eclectic chaoticism was unappealing and left many upset at what could have been the best songs on this album.

“DEARLY DEPARTED” is the most down tempo and purposefully R&B-sounding song on the whole album, describing the sad reality of what happened to Ameer Vann, one of the original members of Brockhampton who was kicked out for sexual assault allegations in 2018. It uncovered stories revealing the true deceiving character of who everyone in the group once called their friend. The idea of facing reality is continued through the next songs on the album. 

The reality of maturing and understanding are pondered on the titular track and track ten, “GINGER” and “BIG BOY,” both equally good songs, though not outstanding like those on previous albums. The same goes for the darker “LOVE ME FOR LIFE” and introductory song “VICTOR ROBERTS,” the debut of the newest member of Brockhampton. 

These do not meet the standards set by the SATURATION trilogy and Iridescence or even the group as a whole, imposing this lacklustre feeling that could have been executed differently. This is especially disappointing, considering these were the songs they chose to close out the album.

In some ways, the once admired eclecticism and uniquely charismatic sound of Brockhampton have actually failed the group this time, creating an inconsistency throughout the album and various songs with no clear formulation as if each member was just given a time and a topic and wrote a rap for it. 

In other ways, “Ginger” can be seen as a new stepping stone for the boy band, a necessary destination in their way towards the end of their time together as a group. 

“Ginger” is an album less for their audience, and more for themselves. It was the chance they took to reflect on what is really happening in their lives and even though it is not always cheerful, they deal with it now, knowing there are hopefully brighter things to come. 

Contact Tala Trad at [email protected]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email